National Insurance Number (NI)

Your National Insurance Number is evidence of your right to work in the UK when you are looking for a job or starting out as self-employed. Your National Insurance number remains the same throughout your life and is made up of two letter, six digits, and one letter at the end (eg. AB987654Z).

There are a range of easy ways to get a reminder of your National Insurance Number:

  • On your payslip
  • On you P60 or P45
  • In the National Insurance section of your personal tax account
  • On letters from HMRC regarding your tax, pension or state benefits

There are some organisations that will need to know what your number is. These include:

  • Your employer
  • HMRC
  • The Department for Work and Pensions – if you claim state benefits
  • Your local council – if you claim housing benefit
  • Electoral Registration Officers – when registering to vote
  • The Student Loan Company – if you apply for a student loan
  • Your pension provider – if you take out ​​a personal or stakeholder pension
  • Your Individual Savings Account provider – if you take out an ISA
  • Authorised financial service providers who help you buy and sell investments

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How do I get a National Insurance Number?

    If you were born in the UK, you will have received it automatically when you turned 16. If you recently moved to the UK and don’t have a National Insurance Number yet, you’ll need to apply for one in order to be able to work. You can do this by visiting the HMRC website!

  • I’ve lost my National Insurance Number!

    The best way to find your National Insurance Number is on your payslips or through your personal tax account. To locate your National Insurance number via the HMRC website, you’ll need to enter some personal details and it will be available immediately.

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